Drama in a Fort: Tughlaq!

Delhi wallas came in large numbers to see history being enacted at the ruins of Kotla Feroze Shah
Delhi wallas came in large numbers to see history being enacted at the ruins of Kotla Feroze Shah

A mad king.

A visionary.

A despot who shifted the entire populace of Delhi to Daulatabad.

A man far ahead of his times, who experimented with coinage but could not implement it.

Sultan Muhammad bin Tughlaq remains an enigma 7 centuries after he ruled this land.

Last week, Delhi wallas and history lovers were in for a treat as they watched the story this 14th century Sultan enacted by stalwarts at the ruins of the Tughlaq fort Kotla Feroze Shah.  The cast comprised stalwarts like Yash Pal Sharma and Himani Shivpuri- and completely riveted the audience. Some pictures from this 50-year-old play

The play took us 7 centuries back in time to a Delhi we can only imagine
Delhi wallas came in large numbers to see history being enacted at the ruins of Kotla Feroze Shah
Muhammad bin Tughlaq: a mad king, or a visionary far ahead of his times?
Delhi wallas came in large numbers to see history being enacted at the ruins of Kotla Feroze Shah
The fort- Kotla Feroze Shah- came alive with the beautiful lighting!
Delhi wallas came in large numbers to see history being enacted at the ruins of Kotla Feroze Shah
Advertisements

10 Comments Add yours

  1. Oh Shit ! I had no idea about this……. Feroz Shah Kotla is across the road from my college, and I missed the play ! 😦

    1. wanderfool says:

      Ohh, sorry to hear that 😦 But keep your eyes and ears open next winter! This play was screened because last year’s Andha Yug was immensely successful. Hopefully they’ll be back next year with another great play 🙂

  2. Puru says:

    It almost seems like Tughlaq returned to his old fort after centuries

    1. wanderfool says:

      Actually, Puru, this fort was the one built and ruled by his cousin & successor, Sultan Feroze Shah Tughlaq. Muhammad bin Tughlaq ruled from Jahanpanah (present day Saket & Malviya Nagar area of Delhi) and very little remains of his palace.

  3. Terrific pictures as ever and yet again I wish I could get to Delhi to see these wonderful things. It looks like this presentation was very special indeed! Magical!

    1. wanderfool says:

      Thanks Ken! The play was indeed pretty good, and the actors well-known names of Indian television. To see the workings of the mind of a king widely discredited today was quite fascinating.

      1. I think that’s what is so important about things like this. I always encourage my history students to ask the question “why?” when looking at history. No one does things for no reason and the ability to put ourselves in that person’s place and understand why they did what they did is so important. It helps us understand why people do what they do today.

  4. twobitwo says:

    wish I had been there to see this one, it looks so very interesting 😦

  5. Dew says:

    Wow!! You know, the best part of staging plays in monuments etc.. is you feel a strange sense of belonging-ness to that era..and you are bound to get goosebumps..

    1. wanderfool says:

      You are right Dew! It was almost as if conspiracies were being hatched real-time.

What do you think, dear reader?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s